Brian Dailey WORDS: A Global Conversation at Baahng & Co in New York City

WORDS is the artist’s investigation into the impact of globalization and its effect on key human structures of language, society, culture, and environment. In each country, Dailey set up his camera with green-screen backdrop and invited random individuals.  Participants were asked 13 words in their native languages: peace, war, love, environment, freedom, religion, democracy, government, happiness, socialism, capitalism, future, and United States.  Each person responded—in a single word—with a first impression and selected a background flag reflecting his or her societal allegiance.  WORDS MULTIMEDIA is a time-based art and engages the viewers in present day issues while invoking a communal sense among global citizens.  In WORDS on WORDS, distinct single-word responses are layered in an immeasurable array of colors enhanced by the lenticular 3D effect. Interjecting his voice in a collaborative manner with the project’s participants, Dailey creates iconoclastic yet playful statements reminiscent of Dada and Surrealist word play.

2020-02-29_07-54-11
WORDS on WORDS, 2019
Set of 13, Solos, Lenticular Prints 20 x 40 in

About the artist

Born 1951 in California, Brian Dailey earned MFA from Otis Art Institute in 1975 and Ph.D. from University of Southern California in 1987 and participated in the pioneering creative experimentation defining the prolific artistic milieu in California in this era.  His early career launched him on a path that—before his full circle back to his arts in 2008—took him through a twenty-year interlude working on arms control and international security.  These unusual experiences were a fertile source of inspiration in his idiosyncratic art practice. With dual citizenship of USA and New Zealand, He lives and works in the Washington D.C. and in Woodstock, Virginia.  His selected solo exhibitions include at Katzen Arts Center, American University Museum in Washington D.C., in 2018 and his mid-career retrospective at Bulgaria’s National Art Gallery in Sofia in 2014. The evocative videoJIKAI was screened on multiple synchronized monitors in New York City in February, 2014, as the featured video in the Times Square Midnight Moment series; a project of ART PRODUCTION FUND. Brian Dailey is represented by Baahng Gallery.

Brian Dailey

WORDS: A Global Conversation

February 11 – March 17, 2020

Baahng & Co New York City, NY

Framing Specifications

BDailey_WORDS_2sm
Painted maple frame with dolphin finish, matching spacer, and strainer

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Terri M Wells Brinton AIR Museum Show

The 2019 Brinton Artists in Residence show features six diverse, nationally recognized artists who were invited for two-week residencies in 2018 to create art en plein air. The Brinton’s Artists in Residence program allows artists the unique opportunity to sketch, draw and paint on The Brinton grounds and also on other scenic locations throughout the area. Resident artists are featured in a group exhibition in the fall of the following year of their residency.

Terri M. Wells “Big Horn Movement III”                 11” x15", watercolor and ink
Terri M. Wells “Big Horn Movement III” 11” x15″, watercolor and ink
Terri M. Wells “Big Horn Movement V”                16” x 38” watercolor
Terri M. Wells “Big Horn Movement V” 16” x 38” watercolor
Terri M, Wells “Big Horn Movement IV”           11” x 15” watercolor and ink
Terri M, Wells “Big Horn Movement IV” 11” x 15” watercolor and ink

About the artist

Terri Wells With an eye for nuanced, vibrant color, and memorable compositions, Terri paints outdoors on-location throughout the U.S. Some paintings are preliminaries for abstract sculptures and studio work. Terri was Plein Air Austin’s president and chairman of the board 2005-2008. She has participated in many national shows including Maynard Dixon Country and America’s Parks Through the Beauty of Art. In 2018, she received a two-week residency from the Brinton Museum in Big Horn, WY. In 2019, Terri was invited to be one of 31 centennial artists for the Art of Texas State Parks Project. Her work sells in national shows, direct, and the Thunderbird Foundation, Mt. Carmel, UT.

TMWells_BrintonAIROpening_5A
Brinton Artists in Residence Exhibition
September 7, 2019 – October 20, 2019
The Brinton Museum Big Horn, Wyoming

Framing Specifications

Terri M. Wells “Big Horn Movement I”     
 11” x 22” watercolor and ink
Terri M. Wells “Big Horn Movement I”
11” x 22” watercolor and ink
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In Bloom: The Botanical Paintings of T. Merrill Prentice

The New Britain Museum of America is exhibiting an array of botanical paintings by Connecticut native T. (Thurlow) Merrill Prentice (1898–1985). This is the most extensive exhibition of these paintings at the NBMAA since their gift by the artist in 1977. Prentice’s vibrant watercolors showcase lively wildflowers and plants found throughout the American Northeast. These plants and flowers became a subject of fascination for the artist, and from the late 1960s to the early 1970s, Prentice produced hundreds of carefully observed paintings of rare and common species. His works were exhibited at venues such as the Hartford Art School and the New York Botanical Garden, and a portfolio of 114 botanical studies by Prentice was published in the book Weeds and Wildflowers of Eastern North America (1973). Capturing the beauty and resilience of flowers in a staggering variety, Prentice’s delicate watercolors serve as inspiration for the preservation and appreciation of our natural world.

T. Merrill Prentice (1898—1985), Day Lily, 1969, Watercolor, 24 x 18 1/8 in., New Britain Museum of American Art, Gift of the Artist

T. Merrill Prentice (1898—1985), Day Lily, 1969, Watercolor, 24 x 18 1/8 in., New Britain Museum of American Art, Gift of the Artist

About the artist

During his life, Prentice was a celebrated architect who ran firms in New York and Hartford from the 1920s to the 1960s, following studies at Yale, Columbia University, and the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris. While studying in France in the mid-1920s, Prentice became interested in watercolor, a medium that he enjoyed using but had little time to devote himself to until four decades later, following his retirement in 1965. After settling in Cornwall, Connecticut, in his later life, Prentice began to observe and paint wildflowers he found throughout his property and the wider region.

In Bloom: The Botanical Paintings of T. Merrill Prentice

March 25, 2019–September 8, 2019

The Helen T. and Philip B. Stanley Gallery

New Britain Museum of American Art, New Britain, CT

nbmaa exhibit 1

Canada Goldenrod , Watercolor 1977.77.95. Wood lily, watercolor 1977.77.53. Burdock, Watercolor 1977.77.70

Framing Specifications

Purple Loosestrife 1971, Watercolor 1977.77.88.
Purple Loosestrife 1971, Watercolor 1977.77.88.
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Evelyn Patricia Terry at Lynden Sculpture Garden in Milwaukee

Over the course of more than fifty years, Evelyn Patricia Terry’s work has made several bodies of work that address the “conundrum of co-existence that repeatedly occupies the news, my thoughts, and many conversations.” In America’s Favor/Guests Who Came to Dinner (and Stayed!), Terry brings together different bodies of work: an iconic table installation, artist books, and mixed media works that layer drawings and other forms of mark-making on sewn rag paper pieces. Terry has mined her five-decade history as an artist to create the exhibition by repurposing the torn and cut sections of etchings, screen-prints, monotypes, and randomly printed rag paper scraps that she has accumulated as a printmaker, and by referencing items in her personal collection, from ethnic dolls to the work of other artists.

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“In America, Wandering and Saving Souls”, 2018, Pastel, ink, thread, acrylic paint on paper, 21 x 9 ½ inches (framed)

In America, She Cared A Lot About Getting Her Hair Did, 2018 Pastel, ink, thread, watercolor on rag paper, 10 ¾ x 31 inches (framed)

In America, She Cared A Lot About Getting Her Hair Did, 2018 Pastel, ink, thread, watercolor on rag paper, 10 ¾ x 31 inches (framed)

America: Guests Who Came to Dinner (and Stayed) #25, 2018 Hand-made artist book
Ink, thread, hair  6 x 5 inches

America: Guests Who Came to Dinner (and Stayed) #25, 2018 Hand-made artist book Ink, thread, hair 6 x 5 inches

About the artist

Evelyn Patricia Terry is a full time professional visual artist, presenter, writer and art collector based in Milwaukee. She works across many media: printmaking, drawing, painting, installation, and public art. During her long career, she has garnered awards, fellowships, grants, and commendations for community work with students and other artists. Concentrating on printmaking, she earned both a BFA and an MS in Visual Arts from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM). She earned an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago after Ruth Milofsky, a UWM arts education professor and mentor, set up a fund to give her a deadline to go back to school so she might be better prepared as an artist.

In 2012, Terry received the Wisconsin Visual Artist Lifetime Achievement Award from a Wisconsin consortium of art and humanity organizations. In 2014 the Milwaukee Arts Board honored her with their Artist of the Year Award. Terry’s work is internationally exhibited and collected; over 400 private, corporate, and public collections own her artwork including the Milwaukee Art Museum, the Museum of Wisconsin Art, the Haggerty Museum of Art at Marquette University, the Racine Art Museum and the Wright Museum of Art at Beloit College. From 2016 through 2018, several universities—including UWM, the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Duke University–acquired Terry’s hand-constructed artists’ books. In 2009, influenced by Dr. Margaret Burroughs, a visual artist, poet, and founder of the DuSable Museum of African American History, and by Chicago art consultant Susan Woodson, Terry founded the Terry McCormick Contemporary Fine and Folk Art Gallery, a home-based gallery, following the death of her partner, self-taught folk artist George Ray McCormick, Sr.

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Evelyn Patricia Terry: America’s Favor/Guests Who Came to Dinner (and Stayed!)

April 28 2019 – July 28, 2019

Lynden Sculpture Garden

Milwaukee, WI

Framing Specifications

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Colors of Lake Tahoe mixed media works by Deborah Lawrence Schafer

“Colors of Lake Tahoe” is a collaboration of Bay Area artist Deborah Lawrence Schafer and the Tahoe Environmental Research Center (TERC).

Upon noticing unmistakable changes to the area when the snowpack on the surrounding mountains all but disappeared in 2015, Schafer became curious about how the drought was affecting the color of the Lake and contacted the team of scientists with the Tahoe Environmental Research Center (TERC) at the University of California, Davis.

“My primary interest is in the capacity for weather and environmental conditions to transform landscape and its relationship to time—and how this reflects life’s transience,” says Schafer.

Scientists with UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center (TERC) began regularly measuring the Lake’s color in May 2012 having tethered hyperspectral radiometers to the NASA-JPL Buoy TB3 (39°06’37”N 120°04’31”W) which were anchored 500 meters deep. Until storms damaged the equipment in 2016, spectral measurements were made at 12 meters and 5 meters during daylight hours.

Schafer created the artworks, a celebration of the Lake’s color, and the area’s scenery, flora and fauna, using spectral measurements of Lake Tahoe taken by TERC scientists.

Reflecting the shifting ecology and conditions experienced by the planet at large, each artwork is overlaid with an original handmade graphite sketch.

 

with-black-bear-at-zephyr-cove

1407271200, (NASA-JPL Buoy TB3) with black bear, Colors of Lake Tahoe series, graphite, and oil over archival digital print on cotton paper, 48″ x 48″, 2018

emerald-bay-with-castillejajpg

1507141345, (Emerald Bay) with Castilleja, Colors of Lake Tahoe series, graphite, and oil over archival digital print on cotton paper, 48″ x 48″, 2019

DSC_1353
DSC_1352

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Born in 1970 in San Antonio, Texas, Deborah Schafer has a BA in Visual Arts from Princeton University, worked at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.  She also curated exhibitions of Latino and Latin American artwork at the Sonoma Valley Museum of Art in Sonoma, California, and El Museo del Barrio, in New York City.  After more than a decade, she left her career in the arts in 2005 around the time when her son and parents met untimely deaths.  These events solidified her interest in the ethereal, but broadened her interest to include biotechnology.  Thereafter, she began helping a doctor-inventor bring new medical devices to market and eventually began painting once again.  Today she continues working on both art and biotech projects.  She is a Mexican National and U.S. citizen and currently lives and works in the Bay Area and coastal Maine.

“Colors of Lake Tahoe”
Deborah Lawrence Schafer
February 14, 2019 – March 22, 2019
Sierra Nevada College
Incline Village, Nevada

FRAMING SPECIFICATONS

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Michael Patrick O’Brien “Familiar Address” at University of New Orleans

Michael Patrick O’Brien “Familiar Address” at University of New Orleans

In his photographs of family members and familial spaces, O’Brien translates the family’s lineage and spaces as sites of both repetition and evolution. Genetics are inherited, body postures are echoed, the formality of interiors is mimicked, values are passed down, death is present, children appear, religious customs are passed down, and family traditions persist and transform. With a photographer’s formal rigor, O’Brien’s starting point is an attention to color and light, yet scale shifts, the articulation of architectural spaces, and an alternation between flatness and depth all provide narrative potential within the photographs and between them. Some pictures depict an immediate, often intimate moment, while others do not seem to be rooted in a moment but instead suggest open-ended stillness and quiet.

At the heart of the project is the pull between being an individual while also being a member of a family, and the competing feelings of loneliness and belonging that ensue. The photographs lie between distance and intimacy. Within a family, one can observe with an outsider’s eye while possessing an insider’s knowledge.

 

Michael Patrick O'Brien "Papa" 2016
inkjet print, 32" x 40 "
Michael Patrick O’Brien “Papa” 2016
inkjet print, 32″ x 40 ”
Michael Patrick O'Brien "Papa’s Room After He Died" 2016/2017 inkjet print
32" x 40"
Michael Patrick O’Brien “Papa’s Room After He Died” 2016/2017 inkjet print
32″ x 40″
Michael Patrick O'Brien "Charlie" 2016
inkjet print,
32" x 40"
Michael Patrick O’Brien “Charlie” 2016
inkjet print,
32″ x 40″

About the artist

A photographer of things, people, and spaces who owes as much to the practitioners large format photography as to representational painters such as Catherine Murphy, John Singer Sargent, and Fairfield Porter, Michael Patrick O’Brien images people and places known to him, primarily family, in an ongoing and open ended body of color photographs. This image-by-image engagement with familiar people and places forms a consistent practice within his broader work as an artist.

Michael Patrick O’Brien (b. 1988, Houston, TX) earned his BA from Washington and Lee University, Lexington, VA (2010). Recent exhibitions include Memoir, Bank of America Center, Houston (2018); Thanks in Advance, Bill’s Junk, Houston (2018); and The Big Show, Lawndale Art Center, Houston (2017). O’Brien lives and works in Houston, TX.

install 01
install 16

Michael Patrick O’Brien “Familiar Address” 

December 8, 2018 – January 5, 2019

St. Claude Gallery University of New Orleans

New Orleans, LA

Framing Specifications

install 24
Painted white gallery frame with spacer and strainer
Painted white gallery frame with spacer and strainer

METRO GALLERY FRAME

Profile: 101
Type: Standard Gallery Frame
Wood & Finish: maple frame with painted white finish
Purchasing Option: joined wood frame
Custom Wood Spacer: 1/2″ wood frame spacer
Custom Wood Strainer: 3/4″ wood frame strainer
Custom Frame Acrylic: 1/8″ UV acrylic cut to size
Custom Frame Backing Board:  1/4″ archival coroplast cut to size




Time Frames: Contemporary East Asian Photography at Baltimore Museum of Art

“Time Frames: Contemporary East Asian Photography” exhibition has more than 40 modern and contemporary photographs by artists mostly born in China, Japan, South Korea, or Vietnam who delve into various concepts of time. Their images could be focused on a time of day, a past legend or history, or an imagined future.

“Time Frames showcases recent important gifts to the BMA’s outstanding photography collection as well as rarely shown works by East Asian artists working in this medium,” said BMA Dorothy Wagner Wallis Director Christopher Bedford. “The extraordinary range of these works extends from hyperbolic and contemplative images to personal experiences and collective histories.”

The exhibition includes photographs, books, prints, and a hand scroll drawn primarily from the BMA’s collection. These works have never been shown in Baltimore or haven’t been displayed by the BMA for decades.

This image is owned by The Baltimore Museum of Art; permission to reproduce this work of art must be granted in writing. Third party copyright may also be involved.

Daido Moriyama. Tokyo. 2008, printed 2012. Collection of Brenda Edelson, Santa Fe © Daido Moriyama

This image is owned by The Baltimore Museum of Art; permission to reproduce this work of art must be granted in writing. Third party copyright may also be involved.

Noh Suntag. Red House No. 01‑13. 2007, printed 2011. From the series Ephemeral. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Gift of Brenda Edelson, Santa Fe, BMA 2018.93. © Noh Suntag

This image is owned by The Baltimore Museum of Art; permission to reproduce this work of art must be granted in writing. Third party copyright may also be involved.

Lê Van Khoa. Rescue. 1974. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Gift of the Artist, BMA 1978.16.3. © Lê Van Khoa

The Baltimore Museum of Art

The BMA’s internationally renowned collection of 95,000 objects encompasses more than 1,000 works by Henri Matisse anchored by the famed Cone Collection of modern art, as well as one of the nation’s finest holdings of prints, drawings, and photographs. The galleries showcase an exceptional collection of art from Africa; important works by established and emerging contemporary artists; outstanding European and American paintings, sculpture, and decorative arts; ancient Antioch mosaics; and exquisite textiles from around the world.

The 210,000-square-foot museum is distinguished by a grand historic building designed in the 1920s by renowned American architect John Russell Pope and two beautifully landscaped gardens featuring an array of 20th-century sculpture.

This image is owned by The Baltimore Museum of Art; permission to reproduce this work of art must be granted in writing. Third party copyright may also be involved.

Time Frames: Contemporary East Asian Photography

November 4, 2018, to March 24, 2019

Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, MD

Framing Specifications

Painted  black gallery frame with spacer and strainer
Painted black gallery frame with spacer and strainer
Painted white gallery frame with spacer and strainer
Painted white gallery frame with spacer and strainer

METRO GALLERY FRAME

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Strainer: 3/4″ wood strainer with crossbar




Art To Live With for students at the University of Chicago

students with art

The Smart Museum provides an art loan program, exclusively for University of Chicago students so they can become acquainted with and appreciate art.

Each fall, students living in the University of Chicago’s residence halls have the unique opportunity to borrow original works of art to live with in their dorm rooms. Students are able to select from 150 specially designated artworks in the Smart Museum’s Art to Live With collection. The program is open to current UChicago students living in College Housing. Works will be loaned at no cost for the duration of the academic year. The following are examples of some of the artwork available for loan.

Max Kahn, ‘Ride by the Black Moon, 1953, edition of 12, color lithograph.⠀
Max Kahn, ‘Ride by the Black Moon, 1953, edition of 12, color lithograph.⠀
Sam Francis, ‘Cloud Rock (left)/Kayo 4 Years Old (right),’ 1964, from the portfolio ‘1 Cent Life,’ ed. 911/2000, color lithograph.⠀

Sam Francis, ‘Cloud Rock (left)/Kayo 4 Years Old (right),’ 1964, from the portfolio ‘1 Cent Life,’ ed. 911/2000, color lithograph.⠀

Roberto Matta Echaurren (called Matta), ‘Cosmicstrip IV,’ 1959, from the series ‘Cosmicstrip,’ plate 4, ed. 13/50, color etching.⠀

Roberto Matta Echaurren (called Matta), ‘Cosmicstrip IV,’ 1959, from the series ‘Cosmicstrip,’ plate 4, ed. 13/50, color etching.⠀

“The best way to become acquainted with art—and to appreciate it—is to live with it.”

The University of Chicago’s Art to Live With student loan program began in the fall quarter of 1958. It was “the product of conversations between artist-dean of students Harold Haydon and alumnus-art collector Joseph Randall Shapiro,” reported the University of Chicago Magazine. Shapiro, who would become the founding president of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, first loaned and then donated works on paper by modern European and local Chicago artists to the University. It was one of the country’s first university art rental programs.

Student browsing Art to Live With collection in 1959

Shapiro hoped the program “would acquaint students with the experience of having an original work of art to live with.” At the beginning of each quarter, students would select works in Ida Noyes Hall, securing the loan with a payment of 50¢ to $1 for insurance.

In the 1980s, however, the loan program was discontinued and works put in storage. In the 1990s, the collection was transferred to the Smart Museum. Under the Smart Museum, works associated with the program were conserved and installed in University buildings and residential common spaces for students and others to enjoy. In fall 2017, the program returned and works from the Art to Live With collection were once again made available for loan to students.

Student Advisory Committee

art at smart

Members of the Student Advisory Committee get the opportunity to visit artists all around Chicago. This past year, the SAC visited Orkideh Torabi in her studio. She was commissioned to create an original work that will be available for loan from the Art to Live program.

student selection smart

This past year, the Smart’s Student Advisory Committee (SAC) worked to expand the Art to Live With collection. Nine of the new acquisitions were proposed and voted on by these students! SAC member and rising second-year Caroline said, “As someone considering curation as a career prospect, it offered an incredibly exciting and unique opportunity to undergo actual curation work as an undergraduate. We were able to choose a piece to propose, research it, and write and present an acquisition proposal.

Framing Specifications

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R. J. Kern at Klompching Gallery in NYC

R. J. Kern’s exhibition at KLOMPCHING GALLERY is the artist’s first solo show in New York, bringing together a selection of color photographs from his three critically-acclaimed projects: The Unchosen Ones, Out To Pasture and Divine Animals: The Bovidae.

"Mr. Hofsós, Skagafjardarsysla, Iceland,” 23.5 x 30 inches, archival pigment print, Ed 7 + 1AP, 2014 © R. J. Kern

“Mr. Hofsós, Skagafjardarsysla, Iceland,” 23.5 x 30 inches, archival pigment print,
Ed 7 + 1AP, 2014 © R. J. Kern

"Dumb and Dumber, Freeborn County, Minnesota, USA" 23.5 x 30 inches, archival pigment print, Ed 7 + 1AP, 2016 © R. J. Kern

“Dumb and Dumber, Freeborn County, Minnesota, USA” 23.5 x 30 inches, archival pigment print,
Ed 7 + 1AP, 2016 © R. J. Kern

"Hazel, Geiranger Fjord, Norway” 23.5 x 30 inches, archival pigment print, Ed 7 + 1AP, 2016 © R. J. Kern

“Hazel, Geiranger Fjord, Norway” 23.5 x 30 inches, archival pigment print,
Ed 7 + 1AP, 2016 © R. J. Kern

About the artist

Kern’s photography is firmly rooted in presenting the human affect on the landscape and an inquisitive exploration of humanity through man’s relationship with domestic animals.

“Kern’s evocation of nature as a device to understand his own sense of self draws upon historical precedence: the use of animals as metaphor and the pastoral tradition. yet the artist’s broad concept—his exploration of identity—is firmly grounded in a contemporary context. This tightly knit series of images, which together characterize the author, is common to our age of social media. Kern’s aesthetic, however, emphasizes clarity and projects a warm stillness that is a balm to an overstimulate society. This contrast, too—the ties to digital media and the rejection of its characteristics—deepens his pastoral project.”.—Lisa Volpe, Associate Curator, Photography, The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

composite

R. J. Kern

May 9 — June 30, 2018

Klompching Gallery

New York, NY

Framing Specifications

Annabelle and Friend, Anoka County, Minnesota, USA, 2017, from the series Out to Pasture 24.5 x 32 inches

“Annabelle and Friend, Anoka County, Minnesota, USA,” 2017,
from the series Out to Pasture 24.5 x 32 inches © R. J. Kern

101MP15, 3/4" spacer, 1/2" strainer
101MP15, 3/4″ spacer, 1/2″ strainer

METRO GALLERY FRAME

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James Grubola “The Friday (and Thursday) Sessions”

This exhibition marks a returning to my first love – figure drawing. In  August 1975 I began teaching drawing in the Department of Fine Arts at the University of Louisville with a special emphasis on figure drawing.  Over the next forty-two years I worked with hundreds of students, scores of models, and set up innumerable poses ranging from the simple and straight-forward to complex or unusual scenes to inspire students and models alike. 

Once I was primarily a figurative artist myself. With the exception of my very first semester, my classes always took place Monday through Thursday.  Fridays were set aside for me to work on my artwork.  Many of these Fridays revolved around hiring a model for a three-hour drawing session in the empty drawing studios on campus.   

James Grubola - The Friday Sessions: “Prelude to a Pose” III
silverpoint 9.5 x 12
James Grubola – The Friday Sessions: “Prelude to a Pose” III
silverpoint 9.5 x 12

After the pose has been set, my figure drawings all begin the same.  Working life-size (or slightly smaller to fit the full figure on the page) I begin by marking the limits of the body on the page with an empty hand.  Just as a ballet dancer “marks” steps in a combination through a series hand gestures to help make a muscle memory, I move over the page trying to visualize key landmarks and measuring distances with my hand creating a muscle memory between my hand and eye of figure before me and the graphic construction to come.  When I finally pick up graphite my first marks make visible these usually anatomical, cardinal points.  Once this gesture locates the key structural lines and positions the figure on the page, the process turns to “fleshing” out the shapes, adding volume and form.

James Grubola - The Friday Sessions: Sunburn Feet graphite 35 x 45
James Grubola – The Friday Sessions: Sunburn Feet graphite 35 x 45

After that first mark violates the blank paper, each drawing reflects my struggle between the image and the drawing itself. For me observational drawing involves subject and object, perception and representation, the hand and body, and most importantly the eye and the mind. Drawing can be the least encumbered and the most intimate of media, but drawing also demands the full attention of the artist and the viewer.  It has been called the diary of the hand because it records the slightest changes of pressure; whether the mark is assured or tentative, made quickly or with slow determination. 

About the artist

James Grubola joined the Department of Fine Arts and the completing his MFA at Indiana University Bloomington where he worked with Distinguished Professor Rudy Pozzatti. A native Detroiter, Grubola earned his BFA from Wayne State University in both printmaking and drawing.

It was during this time that Grubola first began work with the medieval drawing technique of silverpoint. Although he continues to work in a number of different media and techniques including printmaking, his true passion over the years has been for drawing. 

Grubola has maintained an active exhibition record highlighted by several one and two person exhibitions including “30 Years of Silverpoint Drawing” at Nazareth Gallery in Nazareth,  Kentucky and “Lines on the Landscape” an exhibition in the University’s Hite Galleries / Belknap  and a one-person show and artist-in-residency at the Evansville Museum of Art and Science.  Grubola’s work has also been exhibited in numerous invitational and traveling exhibitions and represented in the permanent collections of the Speed Art Museum, and the Indianapolis Museum of Art, and corporate collections of Bristol Myers Squibb, Eastman Kodak, and McGraw Hill Inc.

In 2015 he was named Distinguished Teaching Professor at the University of Louisville.  Grubola also served as Chair of the Department of Fine Arts and Director of the Hite Art Institute for 17 years. 

James Grubola: “The Friday (and Thursday) Sessions”

January 19th – February 24th 2018

Cressman Center for Visual Art

Hite Art Institute, University of Louisville

sitting women pose 1000

FRAMING SPECIFICATIONS

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METRO GALLERY FRAME
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Wood & Finish: maple frame with clear finish
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Framing Advice: joining gallery frames
Framing Advice: fitting gallery frames

 

Capture0018-431 101MP05_50 SPACER

METRO GALLERY FRAMES
Profile: 101
Type: Floating Gallery Frame
Wood & Finish: maple frame with pickled white finish
Custom wood spacer: 1/2″ wood frame spacer
Purchasing Option: unjoined wood frame cut to size with wedges
Framing Advice: joining gallery frames
Framing Advice: fitting gallery frames