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Gregory Euclide at Hasimoto Contemporary in San Francisco

The depiction of land has often been used as a means of celebrating or critiquing culture. The use of pastoral views, banal architecture and everyday trash problematize the traditional definitions of a natural landscape. Through the process of transforming and miniaturizing materials found in the land, objects, in their new context, are no longer discernible as natural or man-made. The juxtaposition of representational modes and materials create a hybrid space where the romanticized and actual intermingle. Contrasts between the flat, painted vistas and artifacts from the land expose the illusion of representation and subsequently confuse the pictorial space, calling into question the authenticity of the objects. The forms fracture the pictorial space, at times, inhabiting the frames, robbing them of their ability to define a single view and inviting a phenomenological exploration by the viewer.characteristic of identity.

"Scrape 1" Acrylic & Organic Matter, on paper, 23" X 14", 2018
“Scrape 1″ Acrylic & Organic Matter, on paper, 23″ X 14”, 2018
"Scrape 7" Acrylic & Organic Matter, on paper, 23" X 14", 2018
“Scrape 7″ Acrylic & Organic Matter, on paper, 23″ X 14”, 2018

About the artist

Gregory Euclide is an artist and teacher living in the Minnesota River Valley. His work has been featured in The Nature of Nature at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts (2014-2015), Badlands: New Horizons in Landscape at MASS MoCA (2008-2009), Otherworldly at the Museum of Arts and Design in New York (2011), Small Worlds at the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio (2011), and was presented as a solo exhibition Nature Out There, at the Nevada Museum of Art (2012).

Euclide’s work has been reviewed and featured in publications such as: Art News, Sculpture Magazine, Art Ltd Magazine, Hi Fructose Magazine and Juxtapoz Magazine. His work is also featured on the 2012 Grammy Award winning album covers of the musical group Bon Iver and on the cover of McSweeney’s Quarterly Concern #43.

Euclide was awarded three Minnesota State Arts Board Artist Initiative Grants through the National Endowment for the Arts, and a Jerome Foundation Residency through the Blacklock Nature Sanctuary. In addition, he was a recipient of the 2011-12 Jerome Foundation Fellowship for Emerging Artists and the 2015-2016 Mcknight Fellowship for Visual Artists. Euclide received his MFA from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design.

euclid installation

Gregory Euclide “Preservation Paradox”

9/8/18 – 9/29/18

Hasimoto Contemporary

San Francisco, CA

"Scrape 1" Acrylic & Organic Matter, on paper, 23" X 14", 2018
“Scrape 1″ Acrylic & Organic Matter, on paper, 23″ X 14”, 2018

Framing Specifications

116 Maple/2" matching spacer/strainer
116 Maple/2″ matching spacer/strainer

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Brian Dailey WORDS at American University Museum

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Brian Dailey’s towering, multi – screen video installation WORDS — the creative summation of an odyssey that took him to nearly ninety countries over the course of six years — is the artist’s investigation into the impact of globalization on the interrelation between language, culture, and environment. While offering a contemporary turn on primordial stories such as the Tower of Babel, the kaleidoscopic, cacophonous, and mesmerizing structure is rooted in the present and seeks to elucidate through this inventive vehicle how languages, and the words upon which they are built, shape our global realities. A powerful visual expression of the challenges faced in communicating across linguistic boundaries and national borders in today’s world , WORDS also reveals the captivating dynamism of humanity in the expressive, physical presence of the range of personalities who come to life on the flickering screens.

Against the backdrop of an international geopolitical landscape undergoing tumultuous and historic changes, Dailey created a list of thirteen words that spoke to larger philosophical concerns facing humanity and found international resonance: Peace, war, love, environment, freedom, religion, democracy, government, happiness, socialism, capitalism, future, and United States. He visited public and private venues on all seven continents, set up his camera and green – screen backdrop in various locales, and invited passersby to be interviewed. A local facilitator presented each of the thirteen words in the participants’ native language and invited them to express — in a single word —the first impression each of the nouns evoked.

Brian Dailey "WAR", 2018 Inkjet on Photo Museum Etching paper 18 x 22 in

Brian Dailey “WAR”, 2018 Inkjet on Photo Museum Etching paper 18 x 22 in

Most frequent responses from around the world: Peace, Death, Destruction

Brian Dailey "DEMOCRACY" 2018 Inkjet on Photo Museum Etching paper 18 x 22 in

Brian Dailey “DEMOCRACY” 2018 Inkjet on Photo Museum Etching paper 18 x 22 in

Most frequent responses from around the world: Freedom, Politics, Liberty

GOVERNMENT

Brian Dailey “GOVERNMENT” 2018 Inkjet on Photo Museum Etching paper 18 x 22 in
Most frequent responses from around the world: Corruption, Power, Good

Brian Dailey "FREEDOM" 2018 Inkjet on Photo Museum Etching paper 18 x 22 in

Brian Dailey “FREEDOM” 2018 Inkjet on Photo

Most frequent responses from around the world: Peace, Happiness, Life

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Words about WORDS
Represented in these prints is every word uttered by the nearly 2,000 participants who responded to the thirteen prompts propelling this project. Giving voice to each and every individual who engaged in the WORDS endeavor, the various responses were calibrated and scaled to reflect the frequency in which they were articulated. The textual array manifest in this print series silently mirrors the poetic elements emanating from the towering installation while visually mapping the same territory.

About the artist

Perhaps no word better characterizes Brian Dailey (b. 1951) than polytropos, the first adjective Homer applies to Odysseus in the Odyssey. Translated from the Greek as “well traveled,” “much wandering,” and, in a more metaphorical sense, as “the man of many twists and turns,” polytropos suitably describes Dailey’s life journey and its many peregrinations. As a student at Otis Art Institute (MFA, 1975) and in his ensuing art career in Los Angeles, Dailey participated in the pioneering creative experimentation defining the prolific artistic milieu in California in this era. His early career launched him on a path that—before bringing him full circle back to his roots as an artist—took him through a twenty-year interlude working on arms control and international security. These unusual experiences, which he approached with the same curiosity that has driven his art, provide a fertile source of inspiration in his idiosyncratic creative practice. As the artist states:

There is art in politics and politics in art. Throughout my life two passions stimulated my curiosity: art and international politics. The tension between two interests generated my intense inquiry into these seemingly diametrically opposed professional fields. In the context of my career, the wanderings through a labyrinth of artistic and intellectual encounters provided a lifetime of eclectic experiences, which, in turn, supplied a bounty of material for my art.

Based in the Washington DC metropolitan area, Dailey is an artist whose work in a range of media, including photography, film, installations, and painting, draws on his multifaceted life experiences. His conceptual and performance based art expands the parameters of the mediums in which he works, defying easy categorization. Engaging with the social, political, and cultural issues of our times, his work is informed by his unusual background and unconventional evolution as an artist.

See more information about the artist and this project: http://www.briandaileyart.com/words/

Brian Dailey WORDS

January 27 – March 11, 2018

American University Museum

Washington, D.C.

Framing Specifications

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Painted maple frame with dolphin finish, matching spacer, and strainer

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James Grubola “The Friday (and Thursday) Sessions”

This exhibition marks a returning to my first love – figure drawing. In  August 1975 I began teaching drawing in the Department of Fine Arts at the University of Louisville with a special emphasis on figure drawing.  Over the next forty-two years I worked with hundreds of students, scores of models, and set up innumerable poses ranging from the simple and straight-forward to complex or unusual scenes to inspire students and models alike. 

Once I was primarily a figurative artist myself. With the exception of my very first semester, my classes always took place Monday through Thursday.  Fridays were set aside for me to work on my artwork.  Many of these Fridays revolved around hiring a model for a three-hour drawing session in the empty drawing studios on campus.   

James Grubola - The Friday Sessions: “Prelude to a Pose” III
silverpoint 9.5 x 12
James Grubola – The Friday Sessions: “Prelude to a Pose” III
silverpoint 9.5 x 12

After the pose has been set, my figure drawings all begin the same.  Working life-size (or slightly smaller to fit the full figure on the page) I begin by marking the limits of the body on the page with an empty hand.  Just as a ballet dancer “marks” steps in a combination through a series hand gestures to help make a muscle memory, I move over the page trying to visualize key landmarks and measuring distances with my hand creating a muscle memory between my hand and eye of figure before me and the graphic construction to come.  When I finally pick up graphite my first marks make visible these usually anatomical, cardinal points.  Once this gesture locates the key structural lines and positions the figure on the page, the process turns to “fleshing” out the shapes, adding volume and form.

James Grubola - The Friday Sessions: Sunburn Feet graphite 35 x 45
James Grubola – The Friday Sessions: Sunburn Feet graphite 35 x 45

After that first mark violates the blank paper, each drawing reflects my struggle between the image and the drawing itself. For me observational drawing involves subject and object, perception and representation, the hand and body, and most importantly the eye and the mind. Drawing can be the least encumbered and the most intimate of media, but drawing also demands the full attention of the artist and the viewer.  It has been called the diary of the hand because it records the slightest changes of pressure; whether the mark is assured or tentative, made quickly or with slow determination. 

About the artist

James Grubola joined the Department of Fine Arts and the completing his MFA at Indiana University Bloomington where he worked with Distinguished Professor Rudy Pozzatti. A native Detroiter, Grubola earned his BFA from Wayne State University in both printmaking and drawing.

It was during this time that Grubola first began work with the medieval drawing technique of silverpoint. Although he continues to work in a number of different media and techniques including printmaking, his true passion over the years has been for drawing. 

Grubola has maintained an active exhibition record highlighted by several one and two person exhibitions including “30 Years of Silverpoint Drawing” at Nazareth Gallery in Nazareth,  Kentucky and “Lines on the Landscape” an exhibition in the University’s Hite Galleries / Belknap  and a one-person show and artist-in-residency at the Evansville Museum of Art and Science.  Grubola’s work has also been exhibited in numerous invitational and traveling exhibitions and represented in the permanent collections of the Speed Art Museum, and the Indianapolis Museum of Art, and corporate collections of Bristol Myers Squibb, Eastman Kodak, and McGraw Hill Inc.

In 2015 he was named Distinguished Teaching Professor at the University of Louisville.  Grubola also served as Chair of the Department of Fine Arts and Director of the Hite Art Institute for 17 years. 

James Grubola: “The Friday (and Thursday) Sessions”

January 19th – February 24th 2018

Cressman Center for Visual Art

Hite Art Institute, University of Louisville

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Amy Sands at Rourke Art Museum

“I am interested in the interaction of color, space and memory – both from a perspective of the artist’s process as well as from the viewer’s active interaction with a finished piece.  My art originates in my interest of the day-to-day experiences influenced by color, pattern and space, and how this is recorded in memory. Lace and craft doilies of family heritage serve as a vantage point for my work.  These compositions become transformed into a deeper temporal and psychological space through the complex layering of the intricate patterns and how they interact with light and shadow.
I choose monotypes mixed with traditional painting methods because of the intimate interactions that arise as they build and change – many times out of my control – forcing me to act and react. In my process, thought is overcome by an impulsive, subconscious interaction. What develops is from the psyche, leading often to layered and oppositional fields of color. Collectively, these layers are refined into the essential ingredients of a moment in space and time.”

​—AMY SANDS, 2018

Amy Sands RevolutionXXXVI monoprint, serigraphy and laser cut on layered kozo 1/1 2017

Amy Sands “RevolutionXXXVI” monoprint, serigraphy and laser cut on layered kozo 1/1 2017

Amy Sands Revolution "Hope" XXXI monoprint, serigraphy and laser cut on layered kozo 1/1 2017

Amy Sands “Revolution:Hope” monoprint, serigraphy on layered kozo 1/1 2017

Amy Sands "Revolution XXX1X" Monoprint, Serigraphy. laser cut on layered kozo 1/1 2018

Amy Sands “Revolution XXXIX” monoprint, serigraphy. laser cut on layered kozo 1/1 2018

About the artist

Amy Sands has exhibited her work in solo and group shows both nationally and internationally, including: Prints Tokyo 2012, Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum; 8th International Printmaking Biennial of Douro, Portugal, 2016; the 2003 Madrid International Print Fair, Madrid, Spain (Estampa) and the 2016 Delta National Small Prints exhibition at the Bradbury Museum in Jonesboro, Arkansas. She has received a first place award for her work at the 57th Midwestern Invitational at the Rourke Art Museum in 2016, and a juror’s award at the 2013 MAPC Juried Members Exhibition at the McDonough Museum of Art, Youngstown, OH.  Sands’ work belongs in the permanent collections of the New York Public Library, Montefiore Hospital, Pratt Institute, Manhattan Graphics Center, Metropolitan State University, Buena Vista University, Central Lakes College as well as many private parties. Sands is currently Assistant Professor at Metropolitan State University and is represented by Muriel Guépin Gallery in New York City.

Amy Sands Exhibition at Rourke Art Museum 1/19/18- 2/18/18
Amy Sands Exhibition at Rourke Art Museum 1/19/18- 2/18/18

Amy Sands: Portal

January 19, 2018 – February 18, 2018

The Rourke Art Museum

Moorhead, MN

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Graphic Discontent: German Expressionism on Paper at Cleveland Museum of Art

Graphic Discontent: German Expressionism on Paper has more than 50 prints and drawings in the exhibition dating from 1905 to around 1922. They present their responses to urban life, the nude, landscape, and war. Together they show how the Expressionists’ new graphic language disrupted and distorted traditional artistic themes to describe both a modern utopia and a hell on earth.

Tanzerinnen (Dancers), 1917. Emil Nolde (German, 1876–1956). Woodcut; 23.8 x 31.2 cm. Delia E. Holden Fund, 1960.158. © Nolde Stiftung Seebüll, Germany

Tanzerinnen (Dancers), 1917. Emil Nolde (German, 1876–1956). Woodcut; 23.8 x 31.2 cm. Delia E. Holden Fund, 1960.158. © Nolde Stiftung Seebüll, Germany

Genesis II, 1914. Franz Marc (German, 1880–1916). Color woodcut; 24 x 20.2 cm. Gift of the Print Club of Cleveland, 1959.228

Genesis II, 1914. Franz Marc (German, 1880–1916). Color woodcut; 24 x 20.2 cm. Gift of the Print Club of Cleveland, 1959.228

Portrait of a Man, 1919. Erich Heckel (German, 1883–1970). Color woodcut; 46 x 32.6 cm. John L. Severance Fund, 1991.109. © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Portrait of a Man, 1919. Erich Heckel (German, 1883–1970). Color woodcut; 46 x 32.6 cm. John L. Severance Fund, 1991.109. © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Marsh Landscape, c. 1930–35. Emil Nolde (German, 1876–1956). Watercolor; 34 x 45.5 cm. Bequest of Dr. Paul J. Vignos Jr., 2011.125. © Nolde Stiftung Seebüll, Germany

Marsh Landscape, c. 1930–35. Emil Nolde (German, 1876–1956). Watercolor; 34 x 45.5 cm. Bequest of Dr. Paul J. Vignos Jr., 2011.125. © Nolde Stiftung Seebüll, Germany

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION

The beginning of the 20th century brought a surge of challenges to the prevailing styles and procedures for art making in Europe. Many young artists in central Europe rejected traditional training in state-sponsored art academies and formed groups with other artists who shared their desire to depart radically from what they saw as art’s emphasis on outward appearances. The groups Die Brücke (The Bridge), founded by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Karl Schmidt-Rottluff, and Erich Heckel in Dresden in 1905, and Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider), founded by Wassily Kandinsky and Franz Marc in Münich in 1911, experimented together with form and technique, leading to groundbreaking publications and exhibitions. These and other artists working in Vienna and Berlin—collectively called the Expressionists—employed a condensed, abstracted visual language to access highly charged emotions or spiritual states.

Prints and drawings were essential to the Expressionists’ quest for art that was direct, frank, and immediate. Drawn from the Cleveland Museum of Art’s collection, Graphic Discontent: German Expressionism on Paper plots the purpose and impact of the graphic arts within the wider German Expressionist movement. Woodcuts—the most emblematic technique of the movement—were suited to the simplification and distortion of forms. New etching and lithographic techniques invited improvisation and promoted accidents in printing, while drawings revealed an artist’s impulse and urgency through direct marks on paper. These graphic media suited the Expressionists’ emphasis on the mystery and spontaneity of emotions.

Graphic Discontent: German Expressionism on Paper
January 14, 2108 – May 13, 2018
James and Hanna Bartlett Prints and Drawings Gallery
Cleveland Museum Of Art Cleveland, Ohio

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Norman Rockwell’s Christmas: Original Artwork for Hallmark

Hallmark has a remarkable legacy of collaboration with some of the world’s most renowned artists and designers. Perhaps none of these is more beloved than the American illustrator Norman Rockwell, whom Hallmark founder J.C. Hall commissioned to produce 32 paintings for the company’s greeting cards between 1948 to 1957, at the height of his career.

The most influential and prolific illustrator of the 20th century, Norman Rockwell (1894-1978) produced art for more than 150 companies throughout his lifetime, including magazine covers for The Saturday Evening Post and annual calendars for the Boy Scouts of America. However, among his most enduring images are his Christmas paintings for Hallmark Cards. Reproduced often and in many contexts, they helped define the spirit and traditions of the holiday season for many Americans. The heartwarming and humorous images have also come to exemplify Rockwell’s unique brand of pictorial storytelling.

Rockwell_FillingTheStockings_1955_HallmarkArtCollection_72dpi

Norman Rockwell , Filling The Stockings, 1955 watercolor, ink and pencil on paper, 13 1/4 x 11 1/2 inches Hallmark Art Collection, Kansas City, Missouri / © Hallmark Cards, Inc.

Rockwell_BoyWithHeadInWreath_1957_HallmarkArtCollection_72dpi

Norman Rockwell, Boy With Head In Wreath, 1957 oil on hardboard, 8 1/2 x 5 3/4 inches Hallmark Art Collection, Kansas City, Missouri / © Hallmark Cards, Inc.

Rockwell_SantasSurprise_1955_HallmarkArtCollection_72

Norman Rockwell, Santa’s Surprise, 1949 watercolor and ink on paper board, 12 3/4 x 10 7/8 inches Hallmark Art Collection, Kansas City, Missouri  / © Hallmark Cards, Inc.

Rockwell_AChristmasPrayer_1949_HallmarkArtCollection_72dpi

Norman Rockwell, A Christmas Prayer, 1949 watercolor and ink on paper, 12 x 10 1/2 inches Hallmark Art Collection, Kansas City, Missouri/ © Hallmark Cards, Inc.

About the exhibition

Hallmark founder J.C. Hall commissioned Rockwell to paint 32 Christmas designs, beginning with images for the 1948 Hallmark Gallery Artists Collection. Over the ensuing decade, Rockwell interpreted the yuletide theme in a variety of guises, ranging from the characters of Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol to the exploits of the modern American family. Reproduced in many contexts over the years, these heartwarming and humorous images have come to epitomize Rockwell’s masterful brand of narrative art.

Norman Rockwell’s Christmas is the most comprehensive exhibition ever assembled of Rockwell’s original art for Hallmark Cards. All works are from the Hallmark Art Collection with historic photographs and ephemera courtesy of the Hallmark Archives in Kansas City, Missouri and Norman Rockwell Museum Collection, Stockbridge, Massachusetts.

 

The exhibit is on display through January 27, 2018 at the Hallmark Art Collection Gallery in Hallmark Visitor’s Center, located in Kansas City’s Crown Center district. Admission is free.

 

NormanRockwellsChristmas_Hallmark_2017_2
NormanRockwellsChristmas_Hallmark_2017_1

Norman Rockwell’s Christmas: Original Artwork for Hallmark
October 7, 2017 – January 27, 2018
Hallmark Art Collection Gallery, Kansas City, Missouri

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Heidi Jensen at Ball State University

Sit Comfortably in a Darkened Room and Think of Nothing: Recent Drawings by Heidi Jensen

In Claude Cahun’s monologue “Helen the Rebel”, the narrative of Helen of Troy is reimagined and retold. Rather than existing as a passive object of desire, Cahun’s Helen collaborates with her husband Menelaus to orchestrate the Trojan War. Her renowned beauty is the result of a training process. Helen relates instructions from Menelaus on how to become beautiful: “. . . sit comfortably in a darkened room and think of nothing. Just that, every day, for a few minutes – gradually and indefinitely increasing the time”. The work in this exhibition casts an oblique eye at subjects homely and humble, extravagant and decorative, and to the biological forces that create transformation in organic life forms.

A thread running throughout my work is confusion of the animate and inanimate, an approach to form leading back to the Surrealists. Brushes, the subjects of many of these drawings, are humble objects that carry suggestions of utility and service. They are tools, used to clear away unwanted matter and ward off compromising, unruly elements. These anthropomorphic forms hover between the male and female, they contain tongue-in-cheek references to physical anatomy. They act without the guidance of a hand, like the endlessly toiling, enchanted marching brooms in Disney’s Fantasia. Drawn with toilet brushes and dusters in mind, these brushes remain unrepentantly bristly, hairy and lowly, while ensnared or beset by decorative ruffles. The drawings are made on rough, dyed paper with gouache, a medium chosen for its flat, opaque qualities. Graphic line is employed to invoke subtle humor and comics.
1_Jensen_Blusher_Gouache_22x30_2016
Blusher, Gouache, Charcoal and Pastel on Khadi paper, 30″ x 22″, 2016
Images copyright of Heidi Jensen, 2016
2_Jensen_DoubleScrub_Gouache_22x30_2016
Double Scrub, Gouache and Pastel on Khadi paper, 30″ x 22″, 2016
Images copyright of Heidi Jensen, 2016
3_Jensen_Scrubber_Gouache_22x30_2016-1
Scrubber, Gouache and Pastel on Khadi paper, 30″ x 22″, 2016
Images copyright of Heidi Jensen, 2016
4_Jensen_Girlie_Gouache_22x30_2016
Girlie, Gouache, Charcoal and Pastel on Khadi paper, 30″ x 22″, 2016
Images copyright of Heidi Jensen, 2016
5_Jensen_Flee_Gouache_22x30_2016
Flee, Gouache and Charcoal on Khadi paper, 30″ x 22″, 2016
Images copyright of Heidi Jensen, 2016

6_Jensen_Molt_Gouache_22x30_2016
Molt, Gouache, Charcoal and Pastel on Khadi paper, 30″ x 22″, 2016
Images copyright of Heidi Jensen, 2016
Exhibition Shot, Scrubber Mediumb
Exhibition Shot 1 Med

About the artist

Heidi Jensen is an Associate Professor of Art at Ball State University, where she specializes in the instruction of drawing. She earned an MFA from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a BFA from the University of Minnesota at Duluth. Recent work has been included in the Great Lakes Drawing Biennial at Eastern Michigan University, in Drawing Never Dies at RedLine Center for Contemporary Art in Denver, CO, in Forms of Adornment: Flesh and the Erotic at Orbit Galleries, Lamar Dodd School of Art, University of Georgia, and in The Base Line: An Exhibition on Drawing at the ARC Gallery and Educational Foundation in Chicago, IL. She is a fellow of several residency programs, including the Millay Colony in New York and La Napoule Foundation in France. Work from this project is featured in the October/November 2017 West edition of New American Paintings. Heidi divides her time between Muncie, Indiana and Salt Lake City, Utah. She collects brushes and dusters of all shapes and sizes. 

Sit Comfortably in a Darkened Room and Think of Nothing: Recent Drawings by Heidi Jensen

November 16 –  November 30, 2017

Atrium Gallery, Ball State University, Muncie IN

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Michael Bentley “New Works on Paper” at Gruen Galleries

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5Bentley48x96
3Bentley52,45x73

“Walking out to the shore every morning and looking out over the sea, I am still in awe of its beauty” — Michael Bentley

With these new works, Bentley continues to explore abstract seascapes, with his unconventional use of gouache. Working with the medium’s brilliance and range of opacities and the intricate use of white pigment, there is a signature luminosity and reflective quality inherent to his earlier works. Bentley pushes the medium and the paper with the number of washes along with the size of the works, which are infused with countless layers applied over months to build the tranquil complexions evoking expanse and calm.

The rich texture and subtleties are not lost under glass, as these works are treated with a unique archival finish and can be taken in without distraction. This notably enhances the feeling of being drawn into the image, especially given the scale of the unusually large pieces, which size up to 48 by 96 inches.

Though not site specific, the imagery summons a stirring familiarity of place that truly resonates. For Bentley, living on the pristine coast of Nova Scotia with the North Atlantic’s intense transforming beauty, provides an endless multitude of palettes, moods and movement to draw from.

Bentley paints from memory and describes that working with this medium generates a daily, metamorphic process, much like the sea that inspires.

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Bentley was born in Wisconsin in 1957 and currently lives in Nova Scotia, Canada. He has exhibited in galleries and museums across the US, and his work can be found in numerous corporate and private collections.

Michael Bentley
New Works on Paper
November 3, 2017 – December 31, 2017
Gruen Galleries
Chicago, IL

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maple frame with graphite finish
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Heidi Hogden: Uncertain Terrain

Heidi Hogden: Uncertain Terrain consists of graphite drawings and paper sculptures created by Hogden while she was the Artist-in-Resident at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. Through these works, Hogden explores the physical frailty of the natural world and the relationship between place and identity on a symbolic level. This work represents moments of transformation; from setting old drawings ablaze and collecting discarded tree trunks to creating objects of contemplation. Hogden seeks to discover the psychological and emotional terrain in understanding the self and the manner in which place becomes a defining characteristic of identity.

Heidi Hogden 1sm

Heidi Hogden, “Resurgence” , liquid graphite and powdered graphite on paper, 60 x 40 inches, 2016

Heidi Hogden 2

Heidi Hogden “Kindling”,  liquid graphite and powdered graphite on paper,  60 x 40 inches, 2017

Heidi Hogden 3

Heidi Hogden, “Up in Smoke”, liquid graphite and powdered graphite on paper, 40 x 60 inches, 2017

About the artist

Heidi Hogden is a artist and a Assistant Professor of Drawing at Arizona State University. She earned her MFA from School of the Museum of Fine Arts in affiliation with Tufts University (2012) and a BFA in Painting from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design (2008). She was formerly a Visiting Professor/Artist-In-Residence at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock (2015-2017), a Visiting Assistant Professor of Painting at the University of South Dakota (2014-2015), and Post Graduate Teaching Fellow at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston (2011-2014). Hogden received a Professional Development Grant from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock (2015) and an artists grant to attend the Vermont Studio Center in Johnson, VT (2014). Her work has been exhibited at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA, at the Arkansas Arts Center in Little Rock, AR, and at the South Dakota Art Museum in Brookings, SD, among others. Her exhibition record reflects both a dedication to drawing as a creative practice and an intellectual curiosity that connects the practice of drawing to larger fields of inquiry and engagement with service-learning and community building projects.

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Heidi Hogden: Uncertain Terrain

Ann Maners and Alex Pappas Gallery

University of Arkansas at Little Rock

FRAMING SPECIFICATIONS AND ADVICE

METRO GALLERY FRAME

Standard Profile: 101
Type: Standard Gallery Frame
Wood & Finish: maple frame with pickled white finish
Purchasing Option: joined wood frame
plastic spacer: 1/4″ clear econospace
Custom Wood Strainer: 3/4″ wood frame strainer with crossbar
Custom Cut Matboard: 4 ply white museum matboard
Custom Frame Acrylic:  regular acrylic cut to size
Custom Frame Backing Board:  archival coroplast cut to size
Framing Advice: fitting gallery frames




Revoliutsiia! Demonstratsiia! Soviet Art Put to the Test at Art Institute of Chicago

The Art Institute of Chicago commemorates the centenary of the Russian Revolution with Revoliutsiia! Demonstratsiia! Soviet Art Put to the Test, an exploration of early Soviet art and its audiences.  It is the largest such exhibition in the United States in more than 25 years.

stenberg

Vladimir Stenberg and Georgii Stenberg. “The Mirror of Soviet Society,” cover for Red Field, no. 19 (May 1928). Ne boltai! Collection. Art © Estate of Vladimir and Georgii Stenberg/RAO, Moscow/VAGA, New York.

el elitzky

El Lissitzky. Photomontage for the International Hygiene Exhibition, Dresden, 1930. Alex Lachmann collection.

el ellitzky

El Lissitzky. Beat the Whites with the Red Wedge, 1920. Ne boltai! Collection.

shakhait

Arkadii Shaikhet. Lenin’s Light Bulb, 1925. The Art Institute of Chicago, restricted gift of Joyce Chelberg. © Arkadii Shaikhet Estate, courtesy of Nailya Alexander Gallery, New York.

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION

The exhibition, running October 29 through January 15, 2018, presents approximately 550 works in fine and applied arts in ways that evoke their original spaces of display. The installation features ten such spaces: battleground, school, press, theater, home, storefront, factory, festival, cinema, and exhibition. In each space original works of art hang alongside reconstructions of Soviet objects, furniture, or standalone rooms, including a Workers’ Club by Aleksandr Rodchenko and a Demonstration Room by El Lissitzky. Demonstration is the point of the exhibition: to show the many ways in which Soviet art and thought helped create an atmosphere of open-ended discussion about the future.

The 1917 Revolution is not treated here as a foregone conclusion but as a spur to conversation and debate. Exhibition curator Matthew Witkovsky, Richard and Ellen Sandor Chair of Photography, emphasizes, “I have tried to avoid treating the events of 1917 as a closed subject, or to imply that what came after was fated. I am most interested by a pressing Soviet concern that I expect will always be timely: determining art’s forms and functions in a society of our own making.”

Revoliutsiia! Demonstratsiia! makes clear that to build a revolutionary society required rethinking life top to bottom. From paintings to dinner plates, every class of object needed restructuring; activities as disparate as brushing one’s teeth or building giant public works were freighted with symbolic as well as practical significance. The cultural output was accordingly diverse, resourceful, and at the same time frenetic in its pace. Russia after 1917 became a showcase of models: models for monuments, models for mass distribution, models for behavior.  This model exhibition allows visitors to better understand the circumstances of the 1917 revolution — and to consider what ideals are embedded in the things of everyday life today.

Revoliutsiia! Demonstratsiia! Soviet Art Put to the Test

October 29, 2017 –  January 15, 2018
Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL

FRAMING SPECIFICATIONS AND ADVICE

114MP13

METRO GALLERY FRAME

Thin Profile: 114
Type: Thin Gallery Frame
Wood & Finish: maple frame with black opaque finish
Purchasing Option: joined wood frame with matching splines
Custom Frame Strainer: 1/2″ wood frame strainer
Custom Frame Backing: 1/8″ archival coroplast cut to size
Framing Advice: fitting gallery frames