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Santiago Ramón y Cajal, glial cells of the mouse spinal cord, 1899, ink and pencil on paper. Courtesy of Instituto Cajal (CSIC).

Santiago Ramón y Cajal, considered the father of modern neuroscience, was also an exceptional artist. He drew the brain in a way that provided a clarity exceeding that achieved by photographs. Combining scientific and artistic skills to produce drawings with extraordinary scientific and aesthetic qualities, his theory that the brain is composed of individual cells…

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Corita Kent was a fine art printmaker and educator.  In her teaching and her art, Corita Kent emphasized the importance of words. Individual letters were used as sources for shape and form, and graphically rearranged to make a visual impact. The content of the words was of equal importance. She drew inspiration from poetry, literature…

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The College of the Arts will honor the SPARK Lifetime Achievement Award winner, Herman Mhire, with an exhibition of 80 of his framed photographs.  The exhibit opens March 5 and continues through March 24, 2017 at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.  Herman Mhire "Green Leaves Falling" - 7 x 5 Herman Mhire "Demon 5" -…

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Landscapes are constructs. They are derived from the complex layering of a particular physical geography with the cultural, political, and other ideological concerns of those that inhabit them. Because they represent an accumulation of human activity over time, their meaning is contingent upon, and reflective of, both historical and contemporary values. A Narrative Atlas of…

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David Luke’s body of work, Invasive, combines photographic imagery of northern Minnesota’s boreal forest with the state’s southern and central prairies. These collaged images visualize imminent transformations to the state’s land and water due to climate change and invasive species. David Luke "Big Lake, Boundary Waters" Archival Inkjet Print David Luke: "Big Moose Lake, Boundary…

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José Guadalupe Posada (1852–1913) was one of Mexico’s most influential political printmakers and cartoonists. Posada produced an extensive body of imagery, from illustrations for children’s games to sensationalistic news stories. He is best known, however, for his popular and satirical representations of calaveras (skeletons) in lively guises, who have become associated with the Día de…

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In Joe Sinness’s recent drawings, portraiture and still life become glossy, yet melancholic, tributes to queer performance. These meticulous works filter cinematic performance, sharp humor and sexual desire through carefully staged still lives and closely observed portraits. Sinness considers this performance a type of strip tease that creates an erotic tension loop between what may…

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