Terri M Wells Brinton AIR Museum Show

The 2019 Brinton Artists in Residence show features six diverse, nationally recognized artists who were invited for two-week residencies in 2018 to create art en plein air. The Brinton’s Artists in Residence program allows artists the unique opportunity to sketch, draw and paint on The Brinton grounds and also on other scenic locations throughout the area. Resident artists are featured in a group exhibition in the fall of the following year of their residency.

Terri M. Wells “Big Horn Movement III”                 11” x15", watercolor and ink
Terri M. Wells “Big Horn Movement III” 11” x15″, watercolor and ink
Terri M. Wells “Big Horn Movement V”                16” x 38” watercolor
Terri M. Wells “Big Horn Movement V” 16” x 38” watercolor
Terri M, Wells “Big Horn Movement IV”           11” x 15” watercolor and ink
Terri M, Wells “Big Horn Movement IV” 11” x 15” watercolor and ink

About the artist

Terri Wells With an eye for nuanced, vibrant color, and memorable compositions, Terri paints outdoors on-location throughout the U.S. Some paintings are preliminaries for abstract sculptures and studio work. Terri was Plein Air Austin’s president and chairman of the board 2005-2008. She has participated in many national shows including Maynard Dixon Country and America’s Parks Through the Beauty of Art. In 2018, she received a two-week residency from the Brinton Museum in Big Horn, WY. In 2019, Terri was invited to be one of 31 centennial artists for the Art of Texas State Parks Project. Her work sells in national shows, direct, and the Thunderbird Foundation, Mt. Carmel, UT.

TMWells_BrintonAIROpening_5A
Brinton Artists in Residence Exhibition
September 7, 2019 – October 20, 2019
The Brinton Museum Big Horn, Wyoming

Framing Specifications

Terri M. Wells “Big Horn Movement I”     
 11” x 22” watercolor and ink
Terri M. Wells “Big Horn Movement I”
11” x 22” watercolor and ink
Capture0018-431 101MP01_50 SPACER_STRAINER

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In Bloom: The Botanical Paintings of T. Merrill Prentice

The New Britain Museum of America is exhibiting an array of botanical paintings by Connecticut native T. (Thurlow) Merrill Prentice (1898–1985). This is the most extensive exhibition of these paintings at the NBMAA since their gift by the artist in 1977. Prentice’s vibrant watercolors showcase lively wildflowers and plants found throughout the American Northeast. These plants and flowers became a subject of fascination for the artist, and from the late 1960s to the early 1970s, Prentice produced hundreds of carefully observed paintings of rare and common species. His works were exhibited at venues such as the Hartford Art School and the New York Botanical Garden, and a portfolio of 114 botanical studies by Prentice was published in the book Weeds and Wildflowers of Eastern North America (1973). Capturing the beauty and resilience of flowers in a staggering variety, Prentice’s delicate watercolors serve as inspiration for the preservation and appreciation of our natural world.

T. Merrill Prentice (1898—1985), Day Lily, 1969, Watercolor, 24 x 18 1/8 in., New Britain Museum of American Art, Gift of the Artist

T. Merrill Prentice (1898—1985), Day Lily, 1969, Watercolor, 24 x 18 1/8 in., New Britain Museum of American Art, Gift of the Artist

About the artist

During his life, Prentice was a celebrated architect who ran firms in New York and Hartford from the 1920s to the 1960s, following studies at Yale, Columbia University, and the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris. While studying in France in the mid-1920s, Prentice became interested in watercolor, a medium that he enjoyed using but had little time to devote himself to until four decades later, following his retirement in 1965. After settling in Cornwall, Connecticut, in his later life, Prentice began to observe and paint wildflowers he found throughout his property and the wider region.

In Bloom: The Botanical Paintings of T. Merrill Prentice

March 25, 2019–September 8, 2019

The Helen T. and Philip B. Stanley Gallery

New Britain Museum of American Art, New Britain, CT

nbmaa exhibit 1

Canada Goldenrod , Watercolor 1977.77.95. Wood lily, watercolor 1977.77.53. Burdock, Watercolor 1977.77.70

Framing Specifications

Purple Loosestrife 1971, Watercolor 1977.77.88.
Purple Loosestrife 1971, Watercolor 1977.77.88.
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Time Frames: Contemporary East Asian Photography at Baltimore Museum of Art

“Time Frames: Contemporary East Asian Photography” exhibition has more than 40 modern and contemporary photographs by artists mostly born in China, Japan, South Korea, or Vietnam who delve into various concepts of time. Their images could be focused on a time of day, a past legend or history, or an imagined future.

“Time Frames showcases recent important gifts to the BMA’s outstanding photography collection as well as rarely shown works by East Asian artists working in this medium,” said BMA Dorothy Wagner Wallis Director Christopher Bedford. “The extraordinary range of these works extends from hyperbolic and contemplative images to personal experiences and collective histories.”

The exhibition includes photographs, books, prints, and a hand scroll drawn primarily from the BMA’s collection. These works have never been shown in Baltimore or haven’t been displayed by the BMA for decades.

This image is owned by The Baltimore Museum of Art; permission to reproduce this work of art must be granted in writing. Third party copyright may also be involved.

Daido Moriyama. Tokyo. 2008, printed 2012. Collection of Brenda Edelson, Santa Fe © Daido Moriyama

This image is owned by The Baltimore Museum of Art; permission to reproduce this work of art must be granted in writing. Third party copyright may also be involved.

Noh Suntag. Red House No. 01‑13. 2007, printed 2011. From the series Ephemeral. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Gift of Brenda Edelson, Santa Fe, BMA 2018.93. © Noh Suntag

This image is owned by The Baltimore Museum of Art; permission to reproduce this work of art must be granted in writing. Third party copyright may also be involved.

Lê Van Khoa. Rescue. 1974. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Gift of the Artist, BMA 1978.16.3. © Lê Van Khoa

The Baltimore Museum of Art

The BMA’s internationally renowned collection of 95,000 objects encompasses more than 1,000 works by Henri Matisse anchored by the famed Cone Collection of modern art, as well as one of the nation’s finest holdings of prints, drawings, and photographs. The galleries showcase an exceptional collection of art from Africa; important works by established and emerging contemporary artists; outstanding European and American paintings, sculpture, and decorative arts; ancient Antioch mosaics; and exquisite textiles from around the world.

The 210,000-square-foot museum is distinguished by a grand historic building designed in the 1920s by renowned American architect John Russell Pope and two beautifully landscaped gardens featuring an array of 20th-century sculpture.

This image is owned by The Baltimore Museum of Art; permission to reproduce this work of art must be granted in writing. Third party copyright may also be involved.

Time Frames: Contemporary East Asian Photography

November 4, 2018, to March 24, 2019

Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, MD

Framing Specifications

Painted  black gallery frame with spacer and strainer
Painted black gallery frame with spacer and strainer
Painted white gallery frame with spacer and strainer
Painted white gallery frame with spacer and strainer

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David Hornung "Intimate Visions" at Delaware Art Museum

I use my memory and imagination to invent pictures. The subjects I like to paint are ordinary—walls, ladders, rocks, trees, simple buildings, garden tools, ropes, bones, rickety tables. I strip subject matter of extraneous detail so that it appears emblematic rather than naturalistic. This also makes it possible to intermingle pictorial elements with abstract and semi abstract shapes. Such stylization allows fluid interrelationships between color, shape and symbol in a way that, I hope, communicates my wonderment at the mystery and uncertainty of existence.

David Hornung "Under Darkness" gouache on handmade paper
11 x 9 3/4", 2018
David Hornung “Under Darkness” gouache on handmade paper
11 x 9 3/4″, 2018
David Hornung "Red Cloud" gouache and casein on handmade paper, 9 x 12", 2018
David Hornung “Red Cloud” gouache and casein on handmade paper, 9 x 12″, 2018
David Hornung, "Night Garden" gouache on handmade paper
11 x 9 7/8", 2018
David Hornung, “Night Garden” gouache on handmade paper
11 x 9 7/8″, 2018

About the artist

David Hornung studied painting at the University of Delaware where he received a BA and at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he earned an MA and MFA.

After college Mr Hornung took a teaching position in the art department at Indiana University-Bloomington. Since then, he has supported himself primarily as a professor of painting, drawing, and color at a number of art schools and universities in the United States. These include the Parsons School of Design, Pratt Institute, Skidmore College, Brooklyn College and The Rhode Island School of Design. He is currently teaching at Adelphi University in New York.

Throughout his career, Mr Hornung has pursued painting and has exhibited widely. He has also made fabric constructions, collages and has recently begun to experiment with a way to combine collage and cyanotype.

While a student at the University of Delaware, Mr Hornung was deeply affected by a color course based on the teaching of Josef Albers at Yale. Color became a major consideration in his work and, at Skidmore College in 1982, he developed his first color curriculum for undergraduate art majors. When he came to The Rhode Island School of Design in the mid eighties, he continued teaching color to undergraduates in a variety of disciplines. There, he designed color curricula for painters, illustrators, textile designers and graphic designers working at times in each of those departments.

By the mid nineties, Hornung’s color course was offered every semester at RISD and, encouraged by a friend and colleague at the Art Institute of Chicago; he began to write a book based upon his color pedagogy. He was inspired by Edward Tufte’s 1990 publication, Envisioning Information and particularly admired the straightforward design of Tufte’s book and the way he placed his illustrations close to the text. Hornung decided to learn the software needed to design his book himself. After a 10-year gestation period, Color: A Workshop for Artists and Designers was published in 2005 by Laurence King Ltd, London. Since then the book has been translated into five languages and a second edition appeared in 2012.

 

install- De. Art Museum

David Hornung “Intimate Visions” 8/25/18 – 1/26/19 Delaware Art Museum

“Intimate Visions”
Paintings on Paper featuring David Hornung, Constance Moore Simon, and Zaneta Zubkova

August 25, 2018 – January 26, 2019

Delaware Art Museum, Wilmington, DE

Glider-David-Hornung-2018-framed-image-3

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Capture0002-712_114MP05_700

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Amy Sands at Rourke Art Museum

“I am interested in the interaction of color, space and memory – both from a perspective of the artist’s process as well as from the viewer’s active interaction with a finished piece.  My art originates in my interest of the day-to-day experiences influenced by color, pattern and space, and how this is recorded in memory. Lace and craft doilies of family heritage serve as a vantage point for my work.  These compositions become transformed into a deeper temporal and psychological space through the complex layering of the intricate patterns and how they interact with light and shadow.
I choose monotypes mixed with traditional painting methods because of the intimate interactions that arise as they build and change – many times out of my control – forcing me to act and react. In my process, thought is overcome by an impulsive, subconscious interaction. What develops is from the psyche, leading often to layered and oppositional fields of color. Collectively, these layers are refined into the essential ingredients of a moment in space and time.”

​—AMY SANDS, 2018

Amy Sands RevolutionXXXVI monoprint, serigraphy and laser cut on layered kozo 1/1 2017

Amy Sands “RevolutionXXXVI” monoprint, serigraphy and laser cut on layered kozo 1/1 2017

Amy Sands Revolution "Hope" XXXI monoprint, serigraphy and laser cut on layered kozo 1/1 2017

Amy Sands “Revolution:Hope” monoprint, serigraphy on layered kozo 1/1 2017

Amy Sands "Revolution XXX1X" Monoprint, Serigraphy. laser cut on layered kozo 1/1 2018

Amy Sands “Revolution XXXIX” monoprint, serigraphy. laser cut on layered kozo 1/1 2018

About the artist

Amy Sands has exhibited her work in solo and group shows both nationally and internationally, including: Prints Tokyo 2012, Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum; 8th International Printmaking Biennial of Douro, Portugal, 2016; the 2003 Madrid International Print Fair, Madrid, Spain (Estampa) and the 2016 Delta National Small Prints exhibition at the Bradbury Museum in Jonesboro, Arkansas. She has received a first place award for her work at the 57th Midwestern Invitational at the Rourke Art Museum in 2016, and a juror’s award at the 2013 MAPC Juried Members Exhibition at the McDonough Museum of Art, Youngstown, OH.  Sands’ work belongs in the permanent collections of the New York Public Library, Montefiore Hospital, Pratt Institute, Manhattan Graphics Center, Metropolitan State University, Buena Vista University, Central Lakes College as well as many private parties. Sands is currently Assistant Professor at Metropolitan State University and is represented by Muriel Guépin Gallery in New York City.

Amy Sands Exhibition at Rourke Art Museum 1/19/18- 2/18/18
Amy Sands Exhibition at Rourke Art Museum 1/19/18- 2/18/18

Amy Sands: Portal

January 19, 2018 – February 18, 2018

The Rourke Art Museum

Moorhead, MN

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Graphic Discontent: German Expressionism on Paper at Cleveland Museum of Art

Graphic Discontent: German Expressionism on Paper has more than 50 prints and drawings in the exhibition dating from 1905 to around 1922. They present their responses to urban life, the nude, landscape, and war. Together they show how the Expressionists’ new graphic language disrupted and distorted traditional artistic themes to describe both a modern utopia and a hell on earth.

Tanzerinnen (Dancers), 1917. Emil Nolde (German, 1876–1956). Woodcut; 23.8 x 31.2 cm. Delia E. Holden Fund, 1960.158. © Nolde Stiftung Seebüll, Germany

Tanzerinnen (Dancers), 1917. Emil Nolde (German, 1876–1956). Woodcut; 23.8 x 31.2 cm. Delia E. Holden Fund, 1960.158. © Nolde Stiftung Seebüll, Germany

Genesis II, 1914. Franz Marc (German, 1880–1916). Color woodcut; 24 x 20.2 cm. Gift of the Print Club of Cleveland, 1959.228

Genesis II, 1914. Franz Marc (German, 1880–1916). Color woodcut; 24 x 20.2 cm. Gift of the Print Club of Cleveland, 1959.228

Portrait of a Man, 1919. Erich Heckel (German, 1883–1970). Color woodcut; 46 x 32.6 cm. John L. Severance Fund, 1991.109. © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Portrait of a Man, 1919. Erich Heckel (German, 1883–1970). Color woodcut; 46 x 32.6 cm. John L. Severance Fund, 1991.109. © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Marsh Landscape, c. 1930–35. Emil Nolde (German, 1876–1956). Watercolor; 34 x 45.5 cm. Bequest of Dr. Paul J. Vignos Jr., 2011.125. © Nolde Stiftung Seebüll, Germany

Marsh Landscape, c. 1930–35. Emil Nolde (German, 1876–1956). Watercolor; 34 x 45.5 cm. Bequest of Dr. Paul J. Vignos Jr., 2011.125. © Nolde Stiftung Seebüll, Germany

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION

The beginning of the 20th century brought a surge of challenges to the prevailing styles and procedures for art making in Europe. Many young artists in central Europe rejected traditional training in state-sponsored art academies and formed groups with other artists who shared their desire to depart radically from what they saw as art’s emphasis on outward appearances. The groups Die Brücke (The Bridge), founded by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Karl Schmidt-Rottluff, and Erich Heckel in Dresden in 1905, and Der Blaue Reiter (The Blue Rider), founded by Wassily Kandinsky and Franz Marc in Münich in 1911, experimented together with form and technique, leading to groundbreaking publications and exhibitions. These and other artists working in Vienna and Berlin—collectively called the Expressionists—employed a condensed, abstracted visual language to access highly charged emotions or spiritual states.

Prints and drawings were essential to the Expressionists’ quest for art that was direct, frank, and immediate. Drawn from the Cleveland Museum of Art’s collection, Graphic Discontent: German Expressionism on Paper plots the purpose and impact of the graphic arts within the wider German Expressionist movement. Woodcuts—the most emblematic technique of the movement—were suited to the simplification and distortion of forms. New etching and lithographic techniques invited improvisation and promoted accidents in printing, while drawings revealed an artist’s impulse and urgency through direct marks on paper. These graphic media suited the Expressionists’ emphasis on the mystery and spontaneity of emotions.

Graphic Discontent: German Expressionism on Paper
January 14, 2108 – May 13, 2018
James and Hanna Bartlett Prints and Drawings Gallery
Cleveland Museum Of Art Cleveland, Ohio

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Revoliutsiia! Demonstratsiia! Soviet Art Put to the Test at Art Institute of Chicago

The Art Institute of Chicago commemorates the centenary of the Russian Revolution with Revoliutsiia! Demonstratsiia! Soviet Art Put to the Test, an exploration of early Soviet art and its audiences.  It is the largest such exhibition in the United States in more than 25 years.

stenberg

Vladimir Stenberg and Georgii Stenberg. “The Mirror of Soviet Society,” cover for Red Field, no. 19 (May 1928). Ne boltai! Collection. Art © Estate of Vladimir and Georgii Stenberg/RAO, Moscow/VAGA, New York.

el elitzky

El Lissitzky. Photomontage for the International Hygiene Exhibition, Dresden, 1930. Alex Lachmann collection.

el ellitzky

El Lissitzky. Beat the Whites with the Red Wedge, 1920. Ne boltai! Collection.

shakhait

Arkadii Shaikhet. Lenin’s Light Bulb, 1925. The Art Institute of Chicago, restricted gift of Joyce Chelberg. © Arkadii Shaikhet Estate, courtesy of Nailya Alexander Gallery, New York.

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION

The exhibition, running October 29 through January 15, 2018, presents approximately 550 works in fine and applied arts in ways that evoke their original spaces of display. The installation features ten such spaces: battleground, school, press, theater, home, storefront, factory, festival, cinema, and exhibition. In each space original works of art hang alongside reconstructions of Soviet objects, furniture, or standalone rooms, including a Workers’ Club by Aleksandr Rodchenko and a Demonstration Room by El Lissitzky. Demonstration is the point of the exhibition: to show the many ways in which Soviet art and thought helped create an atmosphere of open-ended discussion about the future.

The 1917 Revolution is not treated here as a foregone conclusion but as a spur to conversation and debate. Exhibition curator Matthew Witkovsky, Richard and Ellen Sandor Chair of Photography, emphasizes, “I have tried to avoid treating the events of 1917 as a closed subject, or to imply that what came after was fated. I am most interested by a pressing Soviet concern that I expect will always be timely: determining art’s forms and functions in a society of our own making.”

Revoliutsiia! Demonstratsiia! makes clear that to build a revolutionary society required rethinking life top to bottom. From paintings to dinner plates, every class of object needed restructuring; activities as disparate as brushing one’s teeth or building giant public works were freighted with symbolic as well as practical significance. The cultural output was accordingly diverse, resourceful, and at the same time frenetic in its pace. Russia after 1917 became a showcase of models: models for monuments, models for mass distribution, models for behavior.  This model exhibition allows visitors to better understand the circumstances of the 1917 revolution — and to consider what ideals are embedded in the things of everyday life today.

Revoliutsiia! Demonstratsiia! Soviet Art Put to the Test

October 29, 2017 –  January 15, 2018
Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL

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Scott Olson and Jerry Birchfield exhibited by Cleveland Museum of Art at Transformer Station

The Cleveland Museum of Art presents two solo exhibitions featuring new works by Northeast Ohio artists Scott Olson and Jerry Birchfield.  This is each artist’s first institutional solo exhibition, and will be on exhibit at Transformer Station  September 1, 2017 – December 31, 2017.

Jerry Birchfield

The Earth Moves Under My Feet B.12, 2015. Jerry Birchfield (American, b. 1985). Graphite on paper, plaster; 26 x 19 in. © 2017 Jerry Birchfield

The Earth Moves Under My Feet B.12, 2015. Jerry Birchfield (American, b. 1985). Graphite on paper, plaster; 26 x 19 in. © 2017 Jerry Birchfield

About the Artist

Jerry Birchfield’s practice revolves around the question of how images emulate or subvert the sources from which they stem from. Through complex photographic and sculptural processes, his works go through various stages of transformation, from surrogate to self-reference. The making of meaning is synonymous with the search for the beginning and the end.

“Debris, leftovers, the aftermath of other efforts, materials only partially identifiable––like the scene after an accident or disaster, only too clean for that, too controlled. And not the kind of unidentifiable that happens in real life after the car crash or flood, not the kind with real loved ones and family. This is the kind that happens on a primetime drama––the kind where nothing graphic is ever shown or seen, nothing vulgar, and if it is, it is theatrical enough that we know it isn’t real, it couldn’t be, not like this. It is too clean because it is contained. We can see its edges, we can see where it ends.

This un-identification deals in senses, or things already known. Specificity without. . . . It doesn’t matter that we don’t have more, that we don’t know. Broken pieces of wood and dust and dirt don’t have much more to offer anyway. Here they are the filler, the stand-in, and the placeholder. They are the articulation of their representation, an acknowledgment of what they do now rather than what they used to be. To know more about their past is both pointless and beside the point.”

– Jerry Birchfield

Scott Olson

Untitled, 2014. Scott Olson (American, b. 1976). Chalk on paper, unframed: 12 1/2 x 9 1/2 in. © Scott Olson

Untitled, 2014. Scott Olson (American, b. 1976). Chalk on paper, unframed: 12 1/2 x 9 1/2 in. © Scott Olson

About the Artist

Scott Olson’s abstract paintings conceal the deliberate decisions and elaborate processes used in their making. By employing a broad range of techniques and materials, Olson traces the history of painting back to the early Renaissance. At the same time, through subtle shifts and the gradual introduction of new methods and concepts, his small-scale do nothing less than re-examine some of the medium’s long-established boundaries.

“Gesture is very important. It doesn’t have to be bombastic or incorporate your entire body. For me, it’s often my fingers or wrist resting on a bridge I’ve created above the painting. I’ve made some forms by gravity, dropping paint or flowing paint as I’ve worked on a flat surface. It’s organic or natural, a play between that and something more controlled or synthetic. I don’t think about it so much. It becomes an intuitive thing, a means to an end for achieving something else that may even undermine the formal aspects—the forms, figures, shapes.
More recently, and in small ways throughout, there have been subtle introductions of dimensionality or shadow or light––the optical mixing of paint through thin layers or the juxtaposition of dark and light. I think of that not as an inhabitable space, but rather something textural and shallow like the weave of a fabric. It’s still space, there’s dimensionality to that, but it’s not the most alluring or deceptive kind of space that draws you in.”
—Scott Olson

ABOUT TRANSFORMER STATION

ombining a landmark historical building with a contemporary minimalist addition, the Transformer Station is a new anchor destination in Cleveland's rapidly evolving Ohio City neighborhood.
The Bidwell Foundation has agreed to provide the Transformer Station to the Cleveland Museum of Art as its first footprint on the west side of Cleveland. For six months each year, the museum will have a venue for significant new contemporary art projects. The Transformer Station will serve as a laboratory, think tank and place for the Museum to uncover new opportunities, take risks and explore new ideas and new media.

Jerry Birchfield and Scott Olson
September 1, 2017 – December 31, 2017
Transformer Station
Cleveland, OH

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Jerry Birchfield Exhibit

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Scott Olson exhibit




Eugene Richards: The Run-On of Time at George Eastman Museum

For more than forty years, photographer Eugene Richards has explored complicated subjects such as racism, poverty, emergency medicine, drug addiction, cancer, family, aging, the effects of war and terrorism, and the depopulation of rural America. Until now, his work has been known primarily through international news and media outlets, for which he created images on assignment, or through books, wherein he delves into his subjects further using his photographs and first-person texts.

Through 146 photographs, fifteen books, and selected moving image works, The Run-On of Time provides a fuller understanding of Richards’s career, demonstrating how his personal artistic vision draws on the legacies of W. Eugene Smith and Robert Frank to address the salient issues of our time.

Retrospective.017 001

Eugene Richards (American, b. 1944). U.S. Marine, Hughes, Arkansas, 1970. Gelatin silver print. Collection of Eugene Richards. © Eugene Richards

WONDERBREAD

Eugene Richards (American, b. 1944). Wonder Bread, Dorchester, Massachusetts, 1975. Gelatin silver print. Collection of Eugene Richards. © Eugene Richards

SHANTYTOWN

Eugene Richards (American, b. 1944). Back from prison, Shantytown, New York City, 1986. Gelatin silver print. Collection of Eugene Richards. © Eugene Richards

DUSTINHILL

Eugene Richards (American, b. 1944). Dustin Hill with his daughter, Mineral, Illinois, 2008. Gelatin silver print. Collection of Eugene Richards. © Eugene Richards

ROBERTFRANK

Eugene Richards (American, b. 1944). Robert Frank, New York, New York, 2013. Chromogenic development print. Collection of Eugene Richards. © Eugene Richards

About Eugene Richards

Born in Dorchester, Massachusetts, Richards began to photograph seriously while taking classes from Minor White at Massachusetts Institute of Technology after graduating from college. During the Vietnam War, Richards refused the draft and joined VISTA (Volunteers in Service to America), working as a healthcare advocate in eastern Arkansas. Later, he cofounded an organization that published a newspaper, Many Voices, devoted to informing local minority communities of their rights as voters and citizens. Deeply affected both physically and emotionally by the poverty and racial violence he witnessed, Richards found a purpose for his photography. The photographs he made in Arkansas during this period resulted in the publication of his first monograph, Few Comforts or Surprises: The Arkansas Delta (1973). Beginning with this modest yet powerful publication, Richards has used the book format as the primary vehicle for his personal documentary work, publishing more than seventeen monographs throughout his career.

About the exhibition

Co-curated by Lisa Hostetler and April M. Watson, the exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue with essays by each of the curators, published by the Hall Family Foundation in association with The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art and the George Eastman Museum, distributed by Yale University Press.

The exhibition will travel to The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, MO, and will be on view there December 9, 2017–April 15, 2018.

Eugene Richards: The Run-On of Time

June 10, 2017 – October 22, 2017
George Eastman Museum
Rochester, NY

December 9, 2017–April 15, 2018
The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
Kansas City, MO

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STILLNESS: DRAWINGS BY SKIP STEINWORTH at Evansville Museum

I can’t remember a time when I wasn’t making drawings. Some of my earliest memories are from family summer vacations at my parent’s friends’ lake cabin, watching my father sketch the dock or the boat house or the potbellied stove. To me, it seemed like magic; I wanted to be able to do it myself. For most of my more than 35-year-career as a professional artist, I’ve created works almost exclusively in graphite pencil. The medium has always had a fundamental appeal for me. It’s direct and uncomplicated. As such, it is well suited to my sensibility and to my imagery, style, and working methods, all of which are equally straightforward.My work is representational, which to me means more than achieving a pictorial illusion. It is an investigation of our perceptions of the seeable world, an effort to determine what makes things visually “tick”, and to understand what exactly it is that allows us to make sense of what we see. It is an attempt to comprehend and reveal the nature of the interactions of light, space, and form. The process consists of mentally deconstructing, analyzing and distilling a visual essence of the subject which is then “re-presented” to the viewer.Still-lifes have been my primary subject matter. The objects in these arrangements are generally commonplace but are also chosen because of a timeless, almost generic quality I feel they possess. I’ve purposely composed them to be neither time nor place-specific, including only slight, often incongruous, hints of their contemporaneity or significance to me as the artist. Similarly, my landscapes offer no reference to a particular time or place, although their precision and detail suggest an actual location.Despite their simplicity and lack of context (or perhaps because of it) they create intriguing and evocative images. If anything, they are perhaps simply suggestive of the quietude and contemplative environment in which they were created.
Skip Steinworth "White Flowers in Bright Light" 22.5" x 29.5"
Skip Steinworth “White Flowers in Bright Light” 22.5″ x 29.5″
Skip Steinworth "Two Pears" 14" x 10"
Skip Steinworth “Two Pears” 14″ x 10″
Skip Steinworth "Apple"
14" x 11"
Skip Steinworth “Apple”
14″ x 11″
Skip Steinworth "Nest #5"
13.5" x 16.5"
Skip Steinworth “Nest #5″
13.5″ x 16.5”
Skip Steinworth "Paper Bag and Onions" 25.5" x 19.5"
Skip Steinworth “Paper Bag and Onions” 25.5″ x 19.5″
Skip Steinworth "Shoreline, Still Water"
20" x 30"
Skip Steinworth “Shoreline, Still Water”
20″ x 30″

About the Artist
Skip Steinworth lives and works in Stillwater, Minnesota, an historic river town on the outskirts of the Twin Cities along the St. Croix River. His interest in art began at a very early age; by his teens he was selling work in local galleries. After earning their college degrees in the early 1970s, he and his wife taught art in Melbourne, Australia. They returned to Minnesota and both began careers as full-time studio artists. Steinworth works exclusively in pencil and his drawings are included in the permanent collections of the Minneapolis Art Institute, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Plains Museum in Moorhead, Minnesota, the University of North Dakota, and Arkansas Arts Center in Little Rock as well as in numerous private collections. He is represented by the Jenkin Johnson Galleries in San Francisco and New York and the MA Doran Gallery in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

STILLNESS: DRAWINGS BY SKIP STEINWORTH
February 27 –  May 14, 2017
Evansville Museum  Evansville, Indiana

Profile: 102 Wood: Maple Finish: 14 charcoal

FRAMING SPECIFICATIONS AND ADVICE

102MP13

METRO GALLERY FRAME

Profile: 102
Type: Thin Gallery Frame
Wood and Finish: maple frame with charcoal finish
Purchasing Option: joined wood frame
Custom Wood Strainer: 1/2″ wood frame strainer
Framing Advice: fitting gallery frames